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Dr. Bartlow photo



Dr. Noel Bartlow is an assistant professor in the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Missouri. Her areas of specialty are earthquake physics and crustal deformation. All photos taken during research related travel.










Research Projects

Click on a figure to read more about each project. You can also check out my Google Scholar page here.










   People



Group photo

   Group leader: Prof. Noel Bartlow

   MS Students:

    Ryan Yohler

    Nick Benz

   Undergraduate Researcher:

    Amrit Bal














Prospective Students

At this time, I am not accepting new graduate students. I maintain ongoing research collaborations with GNS Science New Zealand, and with the Rock Physics group at the U.S. Geological Survey. Most of my projects involve physical models applied to geophysical data, so my students need to have a solid foundation in math and physics, with some computer programming experience. Students who come from backgrounds other than geology, such as math, physics, or computer science are welcome.

I maintain a set of group guidelines that I expect my students to adhere to. The guidelines are available here. To introduce yourself or ask about potential opportunities, please contact me at bartlowno (at) missouri.edu.













   Curriculum Vitae (abbreviated)

   Dr. Bartlow's full CV can be downloaded here (pdf).

   Professional Experience


Assistant Professor, Department of Geological Sciences, University of Missouri
Jan 2016 - present

Miles Postdoctoral Fellow, Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA
 Jan 2014 - Dec 2015

NSF EAPSI fellow, GNS Science, Lower Hutt, New Zealand
Analyzed slow slip on the Hikurangi margin using GeoNet GPS data
June - August 2012

USGS Rock Mechanics laboratory, Menlo Park, CA
Conducted laboratory triaxial loading tests on Westerly granite with pore fluid under oscillatory loading
2010-2011

   Education


Ph.D., Geophysics, Stanford University
Dissertation: The physics of slow slip, tremor, and associated seismicity from geodetic and laboratory studies
Principally advised by Prof. Paul Segall, with research conducted in part at the US Geological Survey Rock mechanics laboratory supervised by Dr. David Lockner, and at GNS Science supervised by Dr. R. John Beavan
2013

B.S. Physics Carnegie Mellon University 2007






   Teaching Experience


GEOL 8002, Topics in Geological Sciences: Crustal Deformation, University of Missouri Fall 2017

GEOL 3650, Structural Geology, University of Missouri Fall 2016, Fall 2017

GEOL 1150, Physical Geology, University of Missouri Spring 2016, Spring 2017

Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Tsuanmis, Stanford University Educational Program for Gifted Youth (EPGY) Summer 2013






   Publications




Hawthorne, J. and N. M. Bartlow (in revision). Observing and modeling the spectrum of a slow slip event in Cascadia. J. Geophys. Res.


Wallace, L. M., Y. Kaneko, I. Hamling, S. Hreinsdottir, Z. Peng, N. M. Bartlow, E. D’Anastasio, and B. Fry (2017). Large-scale dynamic triggering of shallow slow slip enhanced by low-velocity sediments. Nature Geoscience, doi:10.1038/ngeo3021.


Wallace, L. M., N. M. Bartlow, I. Hamling, and B. Fry (2014). Quake clamps down on slow slip. Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2014GL062367.


Wech, A. G. and N. M. Bartlow (2014). Slip rate and tremor genesis in Cascadia. Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2013GL058607.
         

Bartlow, N. M
., L. M. Wallace, R. J. Beavan, S. Bannister, and P. Segall (2014). Time-dependent modeling of slow slip events and associated seismicity and tremor at the Hikurangi subduction zone, New Zealand. J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2013JB010609.


Bartlow, N. M.
, D. Lockner, and N. M. Beeler (2012). Laboratory triggering of stick-slip  events by oscillatory loading in the presence of pore fluid with implications for physics of tectonic tremor. J.Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2011GL048714.


Bartlow, N. M.
, S. Miyazaki, A. M. Bradley, and P. Segall (2011). Space-time correlation of slip and tremor during the 2009 Cascadia slow slip event. Geophys. Res. Lett., doi:10.1029/2011GL048714.









 
















Contact Prof. Bartlow

email: BartlowNo (at) missouri.edu

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